Author Archives: Robert Earle

About Robert Earle

Robert Earle's new collection of short stories is called She Receives the Night (Vine Leaves Press). Over the years he has published more than 100 stories in print and online literary magazines. He also has published a nonfiction book about Iraq, Nights in the Pink Motel (Naval Institute Press) and a novel, The Way Home (DayBue). Earle was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania and has academic degrees from Princeton and Johns Hopkins. He spent 25 years in the Foreign Service and has lived in many parts of the US, Latin America, and Europe. Now he lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Small Towns into Slums

Amy Goldstein’s Janesville, An American Story reports on the anguish of modest American dreams gasping their last in the hometown of the Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan. Janesville, Wisconsin, once was a manufacturing town. Parker Pen originated there (and was … Continue reading

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Einstein by Walter Isaacson

Walter Isaacson’s biography of Einstein, currently being broadcast as a docudrama by National Geographic, is a skillful, complete, sympathetic but objective study of perhaps the greatest genius who ever lived. It gives equal attention to Einstein’s personal life, his scientific accomplishments, … Continue reading

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First Published Review of She Receives the Night by British writer/reviewer Jack Messenger

She Receives the Night | Robert Earle Jack/ Published by Vine Leaves Press ISBN 9781925417371 Robert Earle’s admirable new collection of short stories ‘tells the stories of women everywhere from New Mexico to Melbourne. They are young and old. Their … Continue reading

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Andrew Jackson and…Donald Trump?

Apparently Steve Bannon recently gave Donald Trump a biography of Andrew Jackson because he sees Jackson as a prototype of Trump. Trump misread or misremembered or couldn’t quite get the book. Be that as it may,  I thought I’d read the same … Continue reading

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The Saddest (Oddest) Story

As I was saying when I recently reviewed Ford Madox Ford’s novel, Parade’s End, I hadn’t read anything else by him since I was a senior in college. Then I read The Good Soldier, which Ford wanted to call The … Continue reading

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Paul Auster & the Mystery of the Double

Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy is a novel written in the form of three novellas whose interconnections are tied together in the last one…more or less. At least two of Auster’s central preoccupations are woven through all three parts. … Continue reading

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Are We Happy Now, Boys and Girls?

Martin Amis’s novel, The Information, is about the malevolent affection that binds two Oxford chums, one a successful writer who doesn’t deserve success and the other an unsuccessful writer who deserves his failure. So Richard (failed) goes to great lengths … Continue reading

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She Receives the Night–Free Review Copies

My new story collection, She Receives the Night, is in the pre-order stage (http://www.vineleavespress.com/she-receives-the-night-by-robert-earle.html), and of course there’s nothing more important to a book launch than reviews, especially on Amazon. So I would be happy to send an ebook (format … Continue reading

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Eros, Life & Words

One of the great pleasures of literature is that it is possible to read a book a week for decades–and sometimes more than a book a week, and sometimes a lot of decades–and still encounter a startling, lovely book that … Continue reading

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Living Lies

Cinco Esquinas (Five Corners) by Mario Vargas Llosa almost won me over in a wonderful chapter toward the end where he masterfully collides multiple plot lines into an authorial stream-of-consciousness, placing every group of characters into rolling, rollicking, high-contrast relief. … Continue reading

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